Choline

Benefits of the Choline Nutrients

Just as vitamin D plays a critical supporting role in the absorption of calcium. Choline nutrients helps omega-3 fatty acids and B vitamins work as they should. Benefits of the choline:

Pregnancy and lactation: Most women of childbearing age are well aware of the importance of folic acid for the development of the baby’s nervous system, although not many know that choline is also necessary.

In animal studies, when they got enough choline before birth, this was linked to better learning, spatial visual skills and better memory later in life. When pregnant women supplement their diet with choline. Their babies are born with lower levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, which could have beneficial effects throughout life in terms of reducing the risk of chronic diseases.

Brain and heart health:

The choline plays a key role in the processing and storage of memories. Fundamental functions for learning and retention of knowledge. In animal studies, having enough choline had an impact on the activation of parts of the brain responsible for memory.

Choline is one of the building blocks of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter that functions as a chemical messenger in the brain. Choline is also part of the membrane of all cells and plays a role in signaling between cells. Because acetylcholine is necessary in nerves for muscles such as the heart. Choline is necessary to regulate the resting heart rate.

Brain Aging: A new area of ​​interest for scientists studying the impact of this nutrient on food is whether improving choline intake could prevent cognitive decline as it gets older. Researchers have observed that high blood levels of the amino acid homocysteine ​​in older adults is related to poor performance in cognitive tasks and functions such as naming of objects, concentration and language.

Choline consumption seems to have an inverse relationship with homocysteine ​​levels. Stimulating further research on the role that choline can play in brain health in older adults.