Cystitis Symptoms and treatment

Cystitis Symptoms

• Pain or burning upon urination
• Frequent need to urinate
• Scanty flow or dribbling
• Cramps in abdomen or lower back
• Nausea or vomiting
• Fever

 

Treatment

Recommended Food

Make sure that you’re getting all the nutrients you need. Plan well-rounded, wholesome meals, made with basic foods that you prepare yourself.

One of the best strategies for fighting a bladder infection is to increase your urine output. Drink as much clean, quality water as you can stand. Try for one 6- to 8-ounce glass every waking hour.

Cranberry juice has long been a folk remedy for bladder infections, and now science helps us understand why: it appears that cranberry juice keeps bacteria from clinging to the linings of the bladder and the urethra. You can find unsweetened cranberry juice at most health food stores and many supermarkets. Drink several glasses a day.

Blueberry juice may help with expelling bacteria from the urinary tract. Drink 10 to 12 ounces.

Natural diuretics will help flush out the infection. Eat plenty of watermelon, celery, or parsley, or use them to make fresh juices.

Add some garlic to clear soups or other meals. It’s a potent infection fighter.

If you must take antibiotics, eat a cup of unsweetened live yogurt or another cultured product every day that you’re on antibiotics. These foods help return “good” bacteria to your body.

 

cystitis, quality water

 

Food to Avoid

Sugar depresses the immune system and encourages the growth of bacteria. Avoid all refined sugars (including those in alcohol) while you’re battling the infection, and restrict them once you’ve recovered.

During the course of the infection, stay away from salty, spicy, processed, or refined foods, as well as caffeine. All of these substances will further aggravate the problem.

Food allergies can cause recurring bladder infections.

Many women who are frequent consumers of sodas (both sugary and diet) experience recurring bladder infections. Sodas, whether made from natural or artificial sweeteners, are never a good idea; if you are troubled by bladder infections, you now have another compelling reason to avoid sodas.

A study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that regular consumption of cranberry juice (10 ounces a day) significantly reduced the amount of bacteria and pus in the urine of elderly women.

Another study found that cranberry capsule extract (400 mg twice daily) for three months significantly reduced the recurrence of urinary tract infections in women ages eighteen to forty-five who had a history of reoccurring infections.