Stinging Nettle

The scientific name of stinging nettle is Urtica dioica, and the plant is one of six subspecies within the Urtica genus. The native range of stinging nettle. Also known as common nettle in some places, is extensive, including Africa, Europe, Asia, and North America.

Nettle (also known as Stinging Nettles) has been used for centuries to treat allergy symptoms. Particularly hayfever which is the most common allergy problem. It contains biologically active compounds that reduce inflammation.


The health benefits of stinging nettle include its ability to detoxify the body, improve metabolic efficiency, boost immune health, increase circulation, improve energy levels, manage menstruation, minimize menopausal symptoms, heal skin conditions, protect kidney and gallbladder health, lower inflammation, increase muscle mass, regulate hormonal activity, prevent diabetes, lower blood pressure, soothe hemorrhoids, and improve respiratory conditions.

 

Arthritis (Stinging Nettle)

Nettle leaves are used to treat painful symptoms of arthritis, gout, rheumatism, and soft tissue conditions such as fibromyalgia and tendonitis. Patients with Lupus and other auto-immune disorders suffering from joint pain experience relief from drinking a cup of nettle tea or eating stewed nettle leaves daily. Its diuretic action alkalizes and releases uric acid from the joints of gout patients eliminating pain.

Taken orally, products made from nettle’s aerial parts may interfere with the body’s production of prostaglandins and other inflammation-causing chemicals. Nettle have an anti-inflammatory effect, reduce the feeling of pain or interfere with the way that nerves send pain signals. All of these effects may reduce the pain and stiffness of arthritis and other similar conditions.

Allergies

Stinging nettle leaves have been used both as an herbal treatment and a homeopathic remedy for the relief of nettle allergies such as asthma, hay fever, hives and other allergic dermatitis.
Decongestants, antihistamines, allergy shots and even prescription medications treat only the symptoms of allergies and tend to lose effectiveness over a period of time. They can also cause drowsiness, dry sinuses, insomnia and high blood pressure. Nettle has none of these side effects. It can be used on a regular basis and has an impressive number of other benefits.

Consuming stinging nettle tea may help prevent seasonal allergies. Or improve symptoms such as sneezing and itching caused by allergic rhinitis if you already have this problem.

Detoxify

Stinging nettles are helpful for bladder and urinary tract function in both sexes. The tea acts as a natural diuretic, increases urination and helps break down kidney stones. Nettles acts as a pelvic decongestant and reduces an enlarged prostate.

The wide range of beneficial nutrients found in stinging nettle make it an ideal detoxifier for the body. As a diuretic substance, stinging nettle can also ensure that those toxins being neutralized in the body are then eliminated quickly. Stinging nettle is also known as an alterative, meaning that it can improve the nutrient uptake efficiency of the gut and ensure that the digestive processes run smoothly, thereby preventing the accumulation of dangerous toxins. Stimulates the lymphatic system, helping to rid the body of excess toxins in the kidneys.

Benefits for women

Stinging nettle has a number of active components that affect feminine health. For painful premenstrual symptoms, stinging nettle can soothe cramping and bloating, while also minimizing blood flow during menstruation due to its astringent capabilities. For women undergoing menopause. Stinging nettle is also useful as it can smooth the transition and act as a restorative so the hormonal shift isn’t as dramatic in the body. It’s often used in herbal tonics to remove fibroids and regulate the menstrual flow.


Nettle is high in iron making it excellent for combating anemia and fatigue. It supports the liver and the female hormonal system. Pregnant women benefit from stinging nettle as it protects against bleeding and strengthens the fetus. Known as a galactagogue, it promotes milk production in nursing mothers.

Circulation

The combination of high vitamin C and iron content in stinging nettle makes it ideal for stimulating red blood cell production. Vitamin C optimizes iron uptake in the gut, while iron is a crucial component of hemoglobin. By increasing the RBC count in the body, circulation increases, wound healing speeds up, and the body’s extremities receive essential oxygenation to boost energy levels. For the same reason, stinging nettle is often recommended to relieve fatigue or anemia. Which is characterized by general muscle weakness, exhaustion, cognitive difficulties, and headaches.